Transition to adulthood

Transition to adulthood is coordinated by the pathway coordinator, with emphasis placed on developing a child or young person’s goals and aspirations, skills and strengths.

The care quality commission report ‘From the Pond into The Sea: Children’s Transition to Adult Health Services‘ (June 2014) highlights the importance of transition:

Young people face lots of challenges when preparing for adult life, all young people require preparation for adulthood and some children and young people will require support from adult services to meet their behavioural, emotional or mental health needs.

The health needs of young people may have been met by the same people who have looked after them for as long as they can remember. However, one of the changes as they reach adulthood is the transfer to an adult environment where they may need to consult several different health and care services. Over the last two decades, there has been much guidance about this process, often referred to as ‘transition’.

A transition plan needs to be developed to support the move of children and young people to adulthood or adult services. This plan should start at 14 years of age, or even earlier. The CQC guidance stresses the importance of good working arrangements between different health and care services at transition.

Transition to adulthood is coordinated by the pathway coordinator, with emphasis placed on developing a child or young person’s goals and aspiration, skills and strengths.

Step 1: Plan

  • A transition plan is formulated and shared with the professionals involved.
  • Any medical reports and/or further assessments that may be required are considered.

Step 2: Implement

  • Interventions are implemented, including accessing a range of services.

Step 3: Evaluate

  • Support is regularly reviewed by the pathway coordinator and appropriate professionals with the child or young person and their parents/carers.

Remember: Consider safeguarding needs throughout